#Abuse of Discretion: The Young Adult Adaptation by Pamela Samuels Young

A Tenacious Teen Faces the Fight of His Life.

The award-winning author of “Anybody’s Daughter” is back with an addictive courtroom drama that gives readers a shocking look inside the juvenile criminal justice system.

Graylin Alexander is a model fourteen-year-old. When his adolescent curiosity gets the best of him, Graylin finds himself embroiled in a sexting scandal that threatens to ruin his life. Jenny Ungerman, the attorney hired to defend Graylin, is smart, confident and committed. She isn’t thrilled, however, when ex-prosecutor Angela Evans joins Graylin’s defense team. The two women instantly butt heads. Can they put aside their differences long enough to ensure Graylin gets justice?

Unbeknownst to Angela, her boyfriend Dre is wrestling with his own drama. Someone from his past wants him dead. For Dre, his response is simple—kill or be killed.

To invite Pamela to a book club meeting or speaking engagement, visit her website at www.pamelasamuelsyoung.com.

 

#Anybody’s Daughter: The Young Adult Adaptation by Pamela Samuels Young

Is Anybody’s Daughter Ever Safe?

Thirteen-year-old Brianna Walker is thrilled. She’s about to sneak off to meet Jaden, her first real boyfriend. But Brianna is in for a horrifying surprise because the boy she met on Instagram doesn’t exist. Instead, Brianna is hurled into a shocking world most people know nothing about. Brianna’s Uncle Dre is not content to wait on police to bring his niece home. He searches the streets of Los Angeles determined to end this nightmare. But will he find Brianna before it’s too late?

 

El Trabajo Nuevo de Maxine (Spanish Edition) by Lynda Jones-Mubarak

Shorty y los Sullivans son mis vecinos. Los Sullivans parecen agradables y amistosos, pero tengo algunas dudas acerca de la Sra. Sullivan. Hmmm, creo que la Sra. Sullivan está ocultando algo. ¿Es una agente secreto? ¿Es una espía alienígena? ¿Es un robot? Mi mamá piensa que hago demasiadas preguntas, ella dice que debería convertirme en una científica forense o una detective. ¡Guau!, Es para pensarlo. Ambas carreras resuelven misterios. ¡Genial! ¡Sigue a Maxine Hill a medida que revela el misterio de la Sra. Sullivan, su vecina!

 

Maxine’s New Job by Dr. Lynda Jones-Mubarak is available in paperback, hardcover and Kindle ebook. Meet the author and read excerpts: https://www.smore.com/xhn65

 

eBook: 
https://www.amazon.com/El-Trabajo-Nuevo-Maxine-Spanish-ebook/dp/B07TFP3LWM

 

Paperback: 
https://www.amazon.com/El-Trabajo-Nuevo-Maxine-Spanish/dp/1626766754

 

Hardcover: 
https://www.amazon.com/El-Trabajo-Nuevo-Maxine-Spanish/dp/1626766746

 

 

Maxine’s New Job by Lynda Jones-Mubarak

Maxine Hill is an inquisitive 4th grade student who has a talent for solving problems and enjoys helping people in need. While using her quirky skills of observation, Maxine discovers an unexpected secret about Mrs. Sullivan, her sweet, quiet neighbor that changed their relationship forever.

 

BOOK REVIEW

We’re back in the world of Shorty and the Sullivans, this time across the street with Maxine Hill, a precocious fourth grader. Maxine is an adorable girl with big glasses and a big heart. Her family is gentle too and I enjoyed meeting them. The illustrations have a cozy feeling to them as we see into the places in Maxine’s world.

The book is definitely on the long side for a picture book. Obviously this isn’t unheard of, I simply tend to prefer keeping picture books shorter and saving more complex stories for transitional chapter books, but that’s totally a personal preference. I think the story and length does make the book a better fit for older audiences, first or second grade and up. If you could get your third and fourth graders into it, it would be great!

From a social justice standpoint I thought this book really tackled some interesting problems. Maxine and her family support being involved in community and helping out how and when they can. They volunteer at a food pantry once a month and started to do so after Maxine noticed an unhoused man and began asking questions. (Side note, I wish the book had called him unhoused instead of homeless.) I really love that her family is so willing to engage in this way and the way Mubarak has written it, it comes across as genuine and sincere instead of didactic.

It’s this ethic of service that leads Maxine to help Mrs. Sullivan, her neighbor across the street, solve a problem. It turns out Mrs Sullivan is functionally illiterate, largely because she struggled so much in school learning to read, never got the help she needed to be successful, and then dropped out of school. I have never seen a picture book that takes on this issue, but it isn’t an uncommon one. I know my library system has a program for adults who are illiterate or need more reading instruction and it isn’t the only program like that out there by any means. It might not be super realistic that a fourth grader is going to help a woman with learning disabilities to learn to read, but I love books that take a positive stance on children stepping in and stepping up, even if it’s not totally plausible. I think it’s a representation of sorts. It shows kids they can help and puts faith in them. No need to squash their optimism and willingness to do good. If anything I think it encourages them to stay engaged and find ways they can help even if it doesn’t look exactly the way they first think it will.

The Hair Adventures of Princess Lindsey Sidney by Eartha Dunston

The Hair Adventures of Princess Lindsey Sidney is a simple, yet powerful tool for parents, educators, and children. It teaches self-love and instills a positive self-image. Vivid illustrations provide the backdrop for this much-needed conversation piece that teaches children to love their hair texture. It will aid in the constant dialogue of self-esteem issues surrounding “good” hair and “bad” hair.

Join Princess Lindsey for a week of “hair adventures” as her hair transitions from straight to frizzy and all style in between!

 

BOOK REVIEW

 

Orsayor Simmons